M 3.7 near Blufdale,UT

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations Released: February 15, 2019 06:45 AM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.7 occurred at 5:09 AM on February 15, 2019 (MST).  The epicenter of the shock was located at the southern end of the Salt Lake Valley, 1.8 miles south of the town of Bluffdale, UT.

This earthquake was preceded by a magnitude 3.2 foreshock at 5:02 am and was followed by six aftershocks, all smaller than magnitude 2.

This morning’s earthquake was reported felt by more than 7,000 residents of the Salt Lake Valley and Utah Valley.  The foreshock was also reported felt.  Since 1962, five earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter of today’s event.  The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.1 on March 16, 1992, located six miles west-southwest of Bluffdale, UT.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey “Did You Feet it?” website.

Magnitude 3.8 near Enterprise, UT

Press Release

Released: January 16, 2019 03:30 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.8 occurred at 03:00 PM on January 16, 2019 (MST).  The epicenter of the shock was located in southwestern Utah, 1.4 miles south of Upper Enterprise Reservoir and 10 miles SW of the town of Enterprise, UT.  A magnitude 2.8 foreshock occurred two minutes before the magnitude 3.8 earthquake.  Ten other earthquakes have occurred in this same area during the past week, ranging in magnitude from 0.8 to 2.9.  Earthquake activity in this area is not unusual.  A total of 11 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred since 1962 within 16 miles of today’s earthquakes.  The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.3 on January 15, 2016, located 12 miles WSW of the town of Enterprise.

Today’s M 3.8 earthquake was reported felt in the town of Central, UT, 14 miles NE of the epicenter, and in the town of Ivins. UT. Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey “Did You Feet it?” website.

M 3.5 north of Paragonah, Utah

PRESS RELEASE
University of Utah Seismograph Stations
Released: October 30, 2018 03:30 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.5 occurred at 02:15 AM on October 30, 2018 (MDT).  The epicenter of the shock was located beneath the Black Mountains in southwestern Utah, 12 miles north of the town of Paragonah, Utah, and 13 mi SE of the town of Minersville, UT.  This earthquake was reported felt in the city of Milford, Utah.  A total of 19 earthquakes of magnitude 3 or greater have occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter of this event since 1962.  The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.6 in 1991, located in the same area as today’s magnitude 3.5 earthquake.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey website:
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/data/dyfi/ .

UUSS is hiring a Postdoctoral Research Associate and a Research Scientist this fall.

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Earthquake Seismology.
The successful applicant will work with UUSS faculty, staff, and students on problems related to induced seismicity. UUSS has active projects related to enhanced geothermal development, mining induced seismicity, and discrimination of explosions from earthquakes. Potential research topics include (1) discrimination of tectonic earthquakes from induced earthquakes and non-earthquake sources, (2) estimation of full moment tensors for small-to-moderate seismic events, (3) estimation of fault parameters of micro-earthquakes, (4) detection and high-resolution multi-event relocation of induced seismic sequences. While primary datasets are available from regional seismic networks, in some cases supplemental data will be generated using the University of Utah pool of over 150 three-component, short-period (5 Hz) Nodal seismometers.
The position is renewable for a second year pending acceptable progress and availability of funding. Opportunities for teaching, mentoring, and outreach will be made available for those interested in pursuing an academic track.
In addition to research, the successful applicant will be expected to serve rotations as a UUSS duty seismologist (leading the initial UUSS response to events of interest), which will periodically require 24/7 availability via cell/pager.
To apply submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests, and contact information for three references using the following webpage: https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/80640. The nominal start date is January 1, 2019, although the actual start date is flexible. Review of applications will begin on October 15, 2018. Questions may be directed to UUSS Director Keith Koper (koper@seis.utah.edu) or UUSS Associate Director Kristine Pankow (pankow@seis.utah.edu).
The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS, quake.utah.edu) invites applications for a full-time staff scientist position. UUSS operates a network of approximately 250 seismic stations (with a combination of broadband, strong-motion, and short-period sensors) and 3 infrasound arrays. Together with the Department of Geology and Geophysics, UUSS also maintains an inventory of 162 three-component, 5 Hz, Nodal geophones that can be used for special studies. In operations, UUSS runs the ANSS Quake Monitoring System (AQMS) and is responsible for generating earthquake catalogs and other earthquake information products for the regions around Utah and Yellowstone National Park, as well as providing information to local stakeholders. The successful applicant will (1) help sustain and improve UUSS operational capabilities for earthquake detection, location, and characterization in the Intermountain West, and (2) work with UUSS faculty, staff, and students on related research problems. Research topics of interest include earthquake detection and location, seismic hazard analysis, discrimination of seismic sources, imaging of shallow Earth structure, seismotectonics of the Intermountain West region, mining induced seismicity, and seismicity induced by geothermal energy development. The new hire will be required to serve rotations as a UUSS duty seismologist, which will periodically require 24/7 availability via cell/pager to carry out the initial UUSS response to events of interest. A Ph.D. in seismology or a closely related field is required at the time of appointment. Other requirements include proficiency in programming and scripting languages commonly used in modern seismology, and strong communication skills. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in network or field seismology and database management. To apply submit a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests, and contact information for three references using the following webpage: https://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/81552. The nominal start date is January 1, 2019, although the actual start date is flexible. Review of applications will begin on October 15, 2018. Questions may be directed to UUSS Director Keith Koper (koper@seis.utah.edu) or UUSS Associate Director Kristine Pankow (pankow@seis.utah.edu).

M 3.8 near Cove Fort, Utah

Press Release

Released: September 12, 2018 12:50 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a small earthquake of magnitude 3.8 occurred at 11:34 PM on September 11, 2018 (MDT).  The epicenter of the shock was located in southwestern Utah in the southern Sevier Desert,  15 miles west-northwest of Cove Fort, UT.  This earthquake was followed by at least four aftershocks in the first hour, the largest of magnitude 2.3.  A total of 19 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter of this event since 1962.  The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.0 on February 23, 2001, 8 miles southwest of Kanosh, UT.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey website:
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/data/dyfi/

Small Salt Lake City Earthquakes Felt and Heard

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that four minor earthquakes of magnitude (M) 0.7 to 1.0 have occurred in northeastern Salt Lake City during the last eight days.  The first two earthquakes occurred on Sunday, September 2, at 02:13 am (M 0.7) and 10:33 am (M 1.0) MDT.  They were followed by an M 1.0 shock on Thursday, September 6, at 8:43 pm MDT and an M 0.8 shock at 3:48 pm MDT on Saturday, September 8.  These four earthquakes occurred near the southeastern part of the University of Utah campus at shallow depths of less than 3.5 miles.

Residents of northeastern Salt Lake City have reported feeling and/or hearing these earthquakes, in some cases describing the noise as a loud boom.  Earthquakes, especially very shallow ones, can generate noises that sound like booms or thunder to those nearby.  The sound is generated by seismic waves vibrating the ground surface up and down like a loudspeaker.

Small magnitude seismic activity like the recent activity in northestern Salt Lake City is a common occurrence in the Wasatch Front region.   The location of this recent activity appears to be too far east for it to be occurring on the Wasatch fault.

Anyone who felt or heard any of these earthquakes is encouraged to fill out a survey form which is available on the US Geological Survey website at https://earthquake.usgs.gov/data/dyfi/ .

Magnitude 4.3 near Soda Springs, ID

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 25, 2018 09:45 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake of magnitude 4.3 (U.S. Geological Survey magnitude) occurred at 08:32 PM on January 25, 2018 (MST). The epicenter of the shock was located beneath the Bear River Valley in southeastern Idaho, 8 mi NW of the town of Georgetown, ID, and 9 miles SE of the town of Soda Springs, ID. This earthquake is an aftershock of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake that occurred on September 2, 2017, 9 miles east of Soda Springs. The magnitude 5.3 earthquake was followed by a very energetic aftershock sequence. Like the M 5.3 mainshock, today’s aftershock was widely felt in southeastern Idaho, western Wyoming, and northern Utah at least as far south as the Salt Lake Valley.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC): January 26, 2018 Time (UTC): 03:32

Date (local): January 25, 2018 Time (local): 08:32 PM MST

Latitude: 42 32.25′ N

Longitude: 111 24.75′ W

Preferred magnitude: 4.30 Mb (USGS)

Earthquake database for Utah Geological Survey Map 277: Utah earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary faults: Utah Geological Survey Open-File Report 667

The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS), and Utah Division of Emergency Management (UDEM) recently published the Utah Earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary Fault Map (UGS Map 277). The new map shows earthquakes within and surrounding Utah from 1850 to 2016, and faults considered to be sources of large earthquakes.

Utah Earthquakes (1850-2016) and Quaternary Faults

 

The faults shown on the map are considered geologically active, have been sources of large earthquakes (about magnitude 6.5 and greater) during the Quaternary Period (past 2.6 million years), and are the most likely sources of large earthquakes in the future. Most of the small to moderate-sized earthquakes on the map are “background” earthquakes not readily associated with known faults and too small to have triggered surface faulting (under about magnitude 6.5).

 

There is a 57% probability (over 1 in 2 chance) that a magnitude 6.0 or greater earthquake will occur in the Wasatch Front region in the next 50 years. To address this threat, the Utah Earthquake Program, consisting of the UGS, UUSS, and the UDEM, developed the map so the public could more fully understand the hazard from earthquakes and faults, as well as the resulting risk to property, infrastructure, and life safety in Utah. Users of the map will be able to determine past earthquake locations and relative magnitudes (size), along with the locations of active faults and the timing of their most recent movement.

 

Printed copies of the map are available for $15 at the Utah Department of Natural Resources Map & Bookstore. The map is also available as a PDF download at https://ugspub.nr.utah.gov/publications/maps/m-277.pdf (44 by 62 inches in size) and can be printed on a wide-format printer.

The database for the seismicity plotted on the map, together with explanatory information, is provided in a companion report:
Arabasz, W. J., Burlacu, R., and Pechmann, J. C., 2017, Earthquake database for Utah Geological Survey Map 277: Utah earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary faults: Utah Geological Survey Open-File Report 667, 12 p. plus 4 electronic supplements, available as a PDF download.
The electronic supplements include the data for the seismic events plotted on the map, which are listed in two separate catalogs, each in the form of a Microsoft Excel workbook and an ArcGIS feature class within a file geodatabase. The catalog files are available for download.

Sulphur Peak Earthquake Information

On September 02, 2017, in eastern ​Idaho ​near ​the ​town of ​Soda Springs a magnitude 5.3 earthquake occurred that was widely felt throughout southeastern Idaho and northern Utah.  This earthquake has been followed by a very active aftershock sequence. These earthquakes are slightly outside of the University of Utah Seismograph Stations area of responsibility, but the area is of interest to UUSS and the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program.

UUSS in partnership with USGS have deployed two UUSS 3-channel strong-motion systems and six USGS 6-channel seismic systems (broadband and strong-motion) within 50 km of the seismicity.

The following page includes information about the earthquake sequence and webicorders for the temporary stations.  We will update the page with more information over time.