1992 – St. George, UT – M 5.8

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

September 2, 1992 – St. George, UT – M 5.8

In the early morning of Wednesday, September 2, 1992 (4:26 a.m. MDT), a magnitude 5.8 earthquake occurred near Washington, Utah.

Most of the destruction occurred near the town of Springdale, Utah, near the mouth of Zion National Park. Utah State Route 9 (SR-9) connecting Springdale and the south entrance of Zion Park was closed as a nearby hillside began to slide down over the road. One report estimated that the slide was moving at 3-4 feet per hour. At one point, the slide was measured at two-thirds of a mile long and one-fifth of a mile wide. The slide left a scarp as high as 50 feet in one location.

Three houses on the hillside were destroyed. Residents in one of the homes attempted to evacuate by car but were impeded by rocks and cracks in the road. They left their car and walked/slid down the hillside. Residents of the second house were helped down the hillside by rescue workers. The third house was unoccupied at the time of the earthquake.

The landslide also swept off telephone poles and lines. And a water line broke under the road, near the south entrance to Zion Park. Springdale and Zion Park were without power for about 24 hours. The Park re-opened the next day, but SR-9 remained closed.

The earthquake was reported felt as far west as Las Vegas, Nevada; as far south as Flagstaff, Arizona; as far to the east as Escalante-Boulder, Utah, and as far north as Richfield, Utah.

In the St. George, Utah area, loosened plaster and minor cracks in walls were reported.

In Hurricane, Utah, windows shook, bookcases were knocked over, and goods on store shelves were shaken to floor. The earthquake caused extensive structural damage to an historical house in the city.

In Toquerville, Utah, a building and at least two automobiles were damaged from a large boulder that rolled down a hillside.

There were several reports that loud blasts were heard just prior to the shaking. One Ivins, Utah resident thought that a gas line had exploded. There were also reports of dust clouds from nearby rockslides.

Some liquefaction occurred along the Virgin River as evidenced by small sand boils and ground cracks.

No deaths or serious injuries were reported in connection with this earthquake.


For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Blank Thumbnail
Personal Accounts 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

Magnitude 4 earthquake near Milford, UT

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 16, 2020 08:30 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake of magnitude 4.0 occurred at 07:31 PM on January 16, 2020 (MST).  The epicenter of the shock was located in southwestern Utah beneath the Mineral Mountains, 10.4 mi SE of the town of Milford, UT and 6 mi NNE of Minersville, UT.  The shock was reported felt by residents of Milford and Cedar City as well as other nearby localities. The earthquake was followed by a magnitude 1.5 aftershock that occurred nine minutes later.

Today’s earthquake occurred in a seismically active area of Utah.   total of 17 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 mi of the epicenter of this event since 1962.

The largest of these events was a magnitude 3.9 on April 10, 1998, 1.4mi NNE of Milford, UT.  In 1991 a magnitude 4.6 earthquake occurred 13 miles SE of Minersville.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey website: https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/uu60356907/tellus.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC):   January 17, 2020         Time (UTC): 02:31

Date (local): January 16, 2020         Time (local): 07:31 PM MST

Latitude:     38 17.50′ N

Longitude:    112 52.43′ W

Preferred magnitude: 4.00 Ml

1962 – Magna, UT – M 5.2

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

September 5, 1962 – Magna, UT – M 5.2

A magnitude 5.2 earthquake occurred in Magna, Utah, on Wednesday, September 5, 1962 at 9:04 a.m.

The earthquake was felt from the Ogden, Utah area in the north, down to the Provo/Spanish Fork, Utah area in the south. Widespread structural damage occurred in the Salt Lake Valley, particularly in the northwest.

Structural damage included: shattered windows, collapsed walls or ceilings, cracked foundations, cracked and falling plaster, fallen chimneys, homes shifted on foundations, and dislodged parapet walls. Cracks appeared in houses and buildings throughout the Valley. In downtown Salt Lake City, building damage was mostly limited to cracks in plaster.

Non-structural damage was also widespread and varied: overturned aquariums, store goods fallen from shelves, broken dishes and so forth. There were many reports of stopped clocks.

A number of schools were closed temporarily due to building damage or until inspections could be completed.

Water lines, gas lines and electrical service were not interrupted. One high-pressure gas leak in Davis County, Utah, was repaired after several hours. Telephones remained in service, however, circuits were jammed by calls—some for several hours. There were no reports of damage to roads or rail lines.

No deaths or serious injuries were reported for this earthquake. One person suffered a broken leg after falling on a floor made slippery by contents from broken bottles. Another person sustained a hip injury from slipping as she tried rush from a building.



For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Blank Thumbnail
Personal Accounts 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

1975 – Pocatello Valley, ID – M 6.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

March 27, 1975 – Pocatello Valley, ID – M 6.0

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake occurred approximately 15 miles southwest of Malad City, Idaho, on Thursday, March 27, 1975 at 7:31 p.m.

Shaking from the earthquake was reported felt as far north as Idaho Falls, Idaho, as far south as Richfield, Utah, as far east as Rock Springs, Wyoming, and as far west as Wells, Nevada. However, the greatest amount of property damage occurred in Malad City, located about 40 miles from the epicenter.

The damage in Malad City was widespread—almost every home and building was affected. An April 11 newspaper report noted that 520 homes and 26 businesses were damaged by the earthquake shaking with seven homes completely destroyed.

Damage included: cracked and collapsed walls, cracked and fallen plaster, cracked foundations, buildings shifted from foundations, downed chimneys and damaged roofs, broken windows and at least one collapsed fireplace. Additionally, dishes and goods fell from shelves and were broken and pictures fell from walls. In some places in town, fallen bricks and mortar littered the streets. Phone service in some areas was temporarily interrupted.

No deaths were reported in connection with the earthquake. There was one reported injury consisting of minor cuts and bruises caused by a falling roof panel.

In the Pocatello Valley, seasonal-use buildings showed damage including: shifting off foundations, cracked walls and downed chimneys. Dishes and goods in cupboards were spilled onto floors. A silo in the area collapsed, spilling grain out onto the ground. Some irrigation wells in the area were also feared to be damaged.

Two large ground fractures north of the Utah-Idaho border were discovered. One fracture, a mile in length, and the other, 200 feet in length were later determined to be fault lines.

In some Utah communities, telephone circuits were overloaded with calls, causing temporary service outages. The earthquake caused a broken water main in Bothwell, Utah. A broken water line and damage to a school building in Salt Lake City were both attributed to the earthquake.



For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Blank Thumbnail
Personal Accounts 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

1901 – Southern Utah – M 6½ ±

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

November 13, 1901 – Southern Utah – M 6½ ±

A magnitude 6½ ± earthquake occurred near Richfield, Utah, at 9:39 p.m. on Wednesday, November 13, 1901. The earthquake was reported felt within an area of 130,000 km2 (roughly 50,000 mi2).

There were reports that the earthquake was accompanied by a roaring sound. The earthquake caused suspended light fixtures to swing, and stopped clocks in many locations. There were a number of reports that the earthquake alarmed animals causing them to call out and behave erratically.

Utah towns reporting damage included: Richfield, Beaver, Joseph, and Elsinore. In these locations there were widespread instances of downed chimneys, cracked walls—particularly in stone and brick buildings, roofs damaged by falling chimneys, and broken windows. Dishes and other goods were shaken from cupboards or shelves and broken. People were greatly frightened with some fainting or rushing into the street.

No loss of life was reported as a result of this earthquake. However, there were reports of a number of near misses from falling walls and ceilings.

Near Marysvale, Utah, cracks in the ground were observed, measuring anywhere from one to 18 inches in width and from a few feet to three hundred feet in length. From some of the larger cracks, fine white sand and water was ejected.

About a mile east of Koosharem, Utah, the ground was greatly disturbed. Some places had sunk and in other places soft earth was thrown up. In one location, earth slid down covering a canal. There was also a report of large ground cracks up to three feet wide, filled with water.

Bullion and Cottonwood canyons, near Marysvale, Utah, were rendered almost impassable from large rocks that rolled down onto roads. Near Junction, Utah, large rocks rolled down from hills in East Fork canyon damaging the wagon road. In some places the water volume of creeks increased 30-50 percent.

There were reports of flashes of light along the ridges and crests of mountains in Piute and Sevier counties.

The earthquake was also reported felt in Salt Lake City, Utah, particularly by those in upper floors of buildings.



For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Additional Resources 3D

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

1921 – Elsinore, UT (series) – M 6 ±

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

September 29, 1921 – Elsinore, UT (series) – M 6 ±

Thursday, September 29, 1921 at 7:12 a.m., a magnitude 6 ± earthquake struck Elsinore, Utah. It was followed by two significant aftershocks: a magnitude 5.7 aftershock at 7:03 p.m. the same day, and a magnitude 6 ± aftershock two days later on Saturday, October 1 at 8:32 a.m.

September 29 Main Shock and Aftershock

There was widespread damage to buildings in the city of Elsinore, including: broken or sunk foundations, downed chimneys and gables, cracked walls and fallen plaster, and damaged roofs and ceilings from falling bricks and cement. Nearly every building the city was damaged . Damage was particularly severe for stone, brick and adobe buildings. Frame structures faired somewhat better. Firewalls at the newly built schoolhouse collapsed into the schoolyard. The walls and roof of the school were badly damaged.

No deaths occurred, but there were many near misses when people ran out of buildings while bricks and other building debris was falling.

In the town of Monroe, approximately five miles southeast of Elsinore, there were reports of cracked walls in several buildings. Goods were shaken off store shelves. A pipe trench caved-in. The Monroe hot springs water turned red.

Clouds of dust were observed in nearby canyons as large rocks and cliff sections were shaken loose and tumbled down to the canyon floor.

A significant aftershock later the same day worsened conditions of buildings already damaged earlier that morning.

October 1 Aftershock

The magnitude 6 ± aftershock on October 1 caused some new structure damage as well as worsening the condition of already damaged buildings.. Walls and roofs collapsed. A paint store in Elsinore that had been severely damaged on September 29 had its storefront collapse onto the sidewalk on October 1.

An Elsinore woman was injured from falling plaster when a chimney fell onto the roof. Nearly all residents living in stone or brick houses slept outside or with neighbors who lived in frame houses. People moved household furniture out into their yards for protection.

Dust clouds above nearby canyons were observed again as more boulders were dislodged, tumbling down into the canyon floor. Water at Monroe hot springs once again turned red. Surrounding hills displayed great white seams where the earth surface cracked.

Extensive damage occurred to buildings in Monroe. Practically all chimneys were downed or cracked severely. Some homes damaged by the main shock, were damaged so severely on October 1, they had to be torn down. Many Monroe residents slept outside, in barns, haystacks or granaries.

Some damage was reported in Richfield, Central and Joseph, Utah. A Richfield man was injured when he was struck by chimney bricks that fell through a ceiling.

Shaking from the main shock and significant aftershocks was felt from Salina, Utah, in the north, south to Marysvale, Utah.



For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Blank Thumbnail
Personal Accounts 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

1994 – Draney Peak, ID – M 5.9

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

February 3, 1994 – Draney Peak, ID – M 5.9

A magnitude 5.9 earthquake occurred approximately 10 miles west of Afton, Wyoming at 2:05 a.m. on Thursday, February 3, 1994.

The earthquake was felt in parts of four states: Idaho, Wyoming, Utah and Colorado. The strongest shaking was reported felt in and around the Star Valley, Wyoming area. Other cities where shaking was felt included: Pocatello, Soda Springs and Montpelier, Idaho; Jackson, Wyoming; Salt Lake City and Moab, Utah; and Grand Junction, Colorado.

Reports from Afton, Wyoming, noted that the earthquake was accompanied by a loud roaring sound. Heavy furniture and large appliances were moved by the shaking. Lamps overturned, items fell from shelves and pictures from walls. Some private water wells were muddied in Star Valley, Wyoming. Some areas reported that their pets appeared to be upset by the earthquake.

In Utah’s Salt Lake Valley, the earthquake set off a number of burglar alarms. The Salt Lake City Dispatch Center was overwhelmed with calls seeking information, making it difficult to respond had there been calls reporting serious damage or injuries.

In the epicentral area, property damage included cracked foundations, structural shifting, damage to plaster walls and chimneys, broken windows, broken dishes and food bottles. A fish hatchery near Auburn, Wyoming reported that the earthquake shifted a support wall, causing the roof of the building to sag.

No deaths or major injuries were reported for this earthquake.



For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Photos 3D Blank Thumbnail
Personal Accounts 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj