1945 – Flathead Lake, MT – M 5.5

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

September 23, 1945 – Flathead Lake, MT – M 5.5

At 2:57 a.m. on Sunday, September 23, 1945, a magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred near Lakeside, Montana on the northwest side of Flathead Lake.

The earthquake was reported felt in western Montana, northern Idaho and eastern Washington. There were reports of dishes and windows rattling from Helena, Montana to Walla Walla, Washington. In Kalispell, Montana the shaking awakened most people. Many reported their homes creaking. No significant damage or injuries were reported.



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1952 – Bigfork, MT – M 5.5

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

March 31, 1952 – Bigfork, MT – M 5.5

A magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred in Montana at 5:37 p.m. on Monday, March 31, 1952. The epicenter was located approximately 15 miles east of Bigfork, Montana—a town on the northeast shore of Flathead Lake, Montana.

Reports from some individuals on the east shore of Flathead Lake noted that pictures swung on the wall and wood in houses creaked. In Kalispell, Montana (approximately 23 miles northwest of Bigfork) it was reported that houses shook, kitchen doors rattled and tables moved.

No injuries or significant damage from this earthquake was reported.



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UUSS invited to become a formal Member-Institution of the International Seismological Centre (ISC).

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) is excited to announce it was recently invited to become a formal Member-Institution of the International Seismological Centre (ISC).

The ISC is a non-governmental, non-profit international organization which maintains extensive information about earthquakes and other seismic events from around the world. ISC members strive to collect, archive, and process seismic station and network bulletins and prepare and distribute the ISC bulletin – the definitive summary of the world’s seismicity.

Since its inception in the 1960s, the ISC has provided invaluable data used by thousands of seismologists worldwide. The current ISC mission is to maintain the ISC bulletin, the International Seismographic Station Registry, and the IASPEI Reference Event list. ISC also maintains several other important catalogs, contacts, and datasets.

The UUSS is honored to join the ISC. It joins 68 other research and operational organizations in 50 countries that support the ISC. Other ISC Members in the United States include NEIC/USGS, IRIS, and the TexNet of the University of Texas at Austin. The invitation to join comes as a great recognition of the important work of the UUSS on a national, and now international, scale.

1894 – Ogden, UT – M 5.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

July 18, 1894 – Ogden, UT – M 5.0

A magnitude 5.0 earthquake occurred in Ogden, Utah at 3:50 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18, 1894.

According to a report, the earthquake was accompanied by a cracking sound similar to the snapping of timbers. The earthquake shook buildings, cracked walls, moved office desks and bookcases, caused items to fall from shelves, light fixtures to sway, and dishes to be shaken from tables. Alarmed individuals fled from buildings. No injuries were reported.



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1891 – St. George, UT – M 5.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

April 20, 1891 – St. George, UT – M 5.0

A magnitude 5.0 earthquake struck St. George, Utah at 6:55 a.m. on Monday, April 20, 1891.

Reports from St. George noted that the earthquake shook houses and rattled windows. Damage included a downed chimney, fallen plaster and broken dishes (Stover & Coffman, 1993). The shaking caused some to feel seasick, while others reported feeling the sensation of an electric shock. Frightened individuals fled from buildings, however, there were no reports of injuries.

The earthquake was also felt in the town of Virgin, Utah, approximately 33 miles to the northeast, where windows, doors and dishes rattled.



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1905 – Shoshone, ID – M 5½ ±

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

November 11, 1905 – Shoshone, ID – M 5½ ±

At 3:26 p.m. on Saturday, November 11, 1905, a magnitude 5 ½ ± earthquake occurred approximately 5 miles southwest of Shoshone, Idaho.

Reports from the town of Shoshone indicated that dishes were knocked from shelves, and cracks occurred in some stone and brick buildings. Widespread damage to ceiling plaster was also reported.

The earthquake was reported felt to the west in Glenns Ferry, Idaho where dishes rattled; northeast in Hailey, Idaho where dishes rattled and glass was broken in some window panes; and to the northwest in Idaho City where the earthquake was widely felt but no damage was done. Felt reports from Boise, Idaho indicated that the earthquake was particularly felt by individuals working on higher floors of buildings where the shaking caused furniture and light fixtures to move.

The earthquake was distinctly felt to the southeast in Ogden, Utah and Salt Lake City, Utah—particularly by those working in upper floors of buildings. The shaking caused many individuals to flee from buildings. Some reported that bookcases, furniture, pictures, light fixtures and appliances moved. Dishes rattled and some clocks stopped. Some individuals reported feeling dizzy and nauseous. However, no significant damage or injuries were reported.



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1945 – Glenwood, UT – M 5.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

November 17, 1945 – Glenwood, UT – M 5.0

In the early evening of Saturday, November 17, 1945 a magnitude 5.0 earthquake occurred approximately 5 miles east of Richfield, Utah.

The earthquake alarmed people in the towns of Glenwood and Richfield, Utah where minor damage to chimneys and plaster occurred (Stover & Coffman, 1993).

No significant damage or injuries were reported.



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1959 – Panguitch, UT – M 5.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

February 27, 1959 – Panguitch, UT – M 5.0

On Friday, February 27, 1959 at 3:19 p.m. a magnitude 5.0 earthquake occurred approximately 15 miles north-northwest of Panguitch, Utah. Individuals in Panguitch and other nearby towns reported feeling the earthquake (Stover & Coffman, 1993).

Stover and Coffman (1993) noted that in Panguitch the earthquake, “knocked plaster from ceilings, cracked walls, and broke dishes and windows.”

No injuries were reported in connection with this earthquake.



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1929 – Lombard, MT – M 5.6

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

February 15, 1929 – Lombard, MT – M 5.6

On February 15, 1929 at 8:00 p.m. a magnitude 5.6 earthquake occurred approximately 20 miles north of Manhattan, Montana.

The earthquake was reported felt in the Montana cities of Deer Park, Logan, Trident, Toston, Missoula, Great Falls and Anaconda. Dishes rattled and light fixtures swayed in some parts of Great Falls. In Missoula and Anaconda, the same phenomena were observed primarily in taller buildings.

In Toston, Montana the earthquake was felt distinctly enough that a crew was sent to survey presumed damage to the nearby Northern Pacific Railway. However, no damage was observed.

No injuries or significant damage were reported in connection with this earthquake.



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M 3.9 near Tremonton, UT

PRESS RELEASE
University of Utah Seismograph Stations
Released: September 24, 2019 11:00 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.9 occurred at 10:15 AM on September 24, 2019(MDT).  The epicenter of the shock was located north of the Great Salt Lake, 14 miles northwest of Tremonton, UT. 

This earthquake was reported felt throughout northern Utah including in the city of Tremonton and the surrounding communities.  A total of 45 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter of this event since 1962.  The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.5 on July 05, 1989, 11 miles west-southwest of Tremonton, UT.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form on the US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC):   September 24, 2019         Time (UTC):   16:15
Date (local): September 24, 2019         Time (local): 10:15 AM MDT
Latitude:     41 48.94′ N
Longitude:    112 23.38′ W
Preferred magnitude: 3.90 Ml