Yellowstone swarm continues with M 3.6 felt near West Yellowstone, MT

Released: July 18, 2017 03:15 PM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.6 occurred at 02:31 PM on July 18, 2017
(MDT). The epicenter of the shock was located 9.3 mi N of W.
Yellowstone, MT. This earthquake is part of an ongoing sequence
of earthquakes that began on June 12, 2017 and included a
a magnitude 4.4 event on June 15, 2017, 9.0 mi NNE of W.
Yellowstone, MT. Today’s M 3.6 earthquake was reported felt in
Yellowstone National Park and in West Yellowstone, MT. It was
followed by numerous smaller earthquakes, the largest of which
had magnitudes of 2.8 and 2.9. The total number of located
earthquakes in the current sequence has now exceeded 1200.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC): July 18, 2017 Time (UTC): 20:31

Date (local): July 18, 2017 Time (local): 02:31 PM MDT

Latitude: 44 47.25′ N

Longitude: 111 2.27′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.60 Ml

Magnitude 4.5 near West Yellowstone, MT

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations Released: June 15, 2017 07:55 PM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake of magnitude 4.5 occurred at 06:48 PM on June 15, 2017 (MDT). The epicenter of the shock was located in Yellowstone National Park, eight miles north-northeast of the town of West Yellowstone, Montana. The earthquake was reported felt in the towns of West Yellowstone and Gardiner, Montana, in Yellowstone National Park, and elsewhere in the surrounding region. Today’s earthquake is part of an energetic sequence of earthquakes in the same area that began on June 12. This sequence has included approximately thirty earthquakes of magnitude 2 and larger and four earthquakes of magnitude 3 and larger, including today’s magnitude 4.5 event. Today’s earthquake is the largest earthquake to occur in Yellowstone National Park since March 30, 2014, when a magnitude 4.8 event occurred 18 miles to the east, near Norris Geyser Basin.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC): June 16, 2017

Time (UTC): 00:48 Date (local): June 15, 2017

Time (local): 06:48 PM MDT

Latitude: 44 46.48′ N

Longitude: 111 2.74′ W

Preferred magnitude: 4.50 Ml

Magnitude 3.7 near Rangely, CO

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: April 22, 2017 02:00 PM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.70 occurred at 11:48 AM on April 22, 2017
(MDT). The epicenter of the shock was located in northwestern Colorado,
2.5 miles northwest of the town of Rangely, CO. The earthquake was
reported felt in the town of Rangely. A total of 11 earthquakes of
magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter
of this event since 1962. The largest of these events was a magnitude
4.6 on March 20, 1995, which occurred in the same area.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC): April 22, 2017 Time (UTC): 17:48

Date (local): April 22, 2017 Time (local): 11:48 AM MDT

Latitude: 40 6.60′ N

Longitude: 108 50.48′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.7 Ml

Magnitude 3.8 near Bluff, UT

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: April 21, 2017 11:30 PM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.8 occurred at 10:01 PM on April 21, 2017
(MDT). The epicenter of the shock was located 13 mi WSW of
Montezuma Creek, UT. One earthquake of magnitude 3.0 or greater has
occurred within 16 mi of the epicenter of this event since 1962. This
was a magnitude 3.7 on June 06, 2008, 9 mi WNW of
Montezuma Creek, UT.

Today’s earthquake was reported felt in the town of Blanding, UT.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC): April 22, 2017 Time (UTC): 04:01

Date (local): April 21, 2017 Time (local): 10:01 PM MDT

Latitude: 37 14.73′ N

Longitude: 109 34.10′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.8 Ml

Magnitude 3.3 near Cedar City, UT

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: March 05, 2017 1:30 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.3 occurred at 12:14 PM on March 05, 2017
(MST).  The epicenter of the shock was located in the Cedar Valley,
6 miles WSW of Enoch, UT and 7.1 miles NNW of Cedar City, Utah.

The earthquake was reported felt in the vicinity of Cedar City.
A total of 34 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have
occurred within 16 miles of the epicenter of this event since 1962.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.

Earthquake Summary:

Date (UTC):   March 05, 2017         Time (UTC):   19:14

Date (local): March 05, 2017         Time (local): 12:14 PM MST

Latitude:     37 45.82′ N

Longitude:    113 7.99′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.30 Ml

UUSS and University of Utah Seismology at AGU 2016

AGU Fall Meeting 2016 (American Geophysical Union) presentations from UUSS and other University of Utah Seismologists.

Amir Allam

Jamie Farrell

Paul Geimer

Keith Koper

Guanning Pang

Kevin Ward

Sin-Mei Wu

Hao Zhang

 

Origins of a National Seismic System in the United States

Origins of a National Seismic System in the United States

John R. Filson, Walter J. Arabasz

ABSTRACT

This historical review traces the origins of the current national seismic system in the United States, a cooperative effort that unifies national, regional, and local-scale seismic monitoring within the structure of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). The review covers (1) the history and technological evolution of U.S. seismic networks leading up to the 1990s, (2) factors that made the 1960s and 1970s a watershed period for national attention to seismology, earthquake hazards, and seismic monitoring, (3) genesis of the vision of a national seismic system during 1980–1983, (4) obstacles and breakthroughs during 1984–1989, (5) consensus building and convergence during 1990–1992, and finally (6) the twostep realization of a national system during 1993–2000. Particular importance is placed on developments during the period between 1980 and 1993 that culminated in the adoption of a charter for the Council of the National Seismic System (CNSS)—the foundation for the later ANSS. Central to this story is how many individuals worked together toward a common goal of a more rational and sustainable approach to national earthquake monitoring in the United States. The review ends with the emergence of ANSS during 1999 and 2000 and its statutory authorization by Congress in November 2000.

Magnitude 3.2 near Bluffdale, Utah

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: November 25, 2016 09:45 AM MST
The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.2 occurred at 08:45 AM on November 25, 2016
(MST). The epicenter of the shock was located 6 miles below the
Traverse Mountains at the southern end of the Salt Lake Valley, 4.1 mi
SW of Bluffdale, UT. This earthquake was widely felt in the southern
Salt Lake Valley and northern Utah Valley. The largest earthquake
previously recorded in this area was a magnitude 4.1 event on March 16,
1992.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.
Earthquake Summary:
Date (UTC): November 25, 2016 Time (UTC): 15:45

Date (local): November 25, 2016 Time (local): 08:45 AM MST

Latitude: 40 27.17′ N

Longitude: 111 59.83′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.20 Ml

Salt Lake City’s Fix the Bricks Program

Fix the Bricks is Salt lake City’s plan to help homeowners afford seismic improvments to homes.

Unreinforced masonry buildings and homes (URMs) create the greatest risk for the Salt Lake Valley in the expected Utah earthquake. Fix the Bricks, facilitates seismic improvements to URMs to save lives. Preparedness starts at home, Act Now! Determine if your home is at risk and register to receive more information about how to get started including financial incentives available for making seismic improvement.

RIGHT NOW YOU CAN APPLY FOR A GRANT TO RECEIVE UP TO 75% OF YOUR SEISMIC RETROFIT COST.

Sign up at www.bereadyslc.com/go/doc/6354/2122438/

KSL.com story

Dr. Bob Smith’s interview on NPR’s Hear & Now

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a tour of Yellowstone National Park’s geyser basin with a park ranger and a scientist who’s been studying the geology of the park for nearly 60 years.

Yellowstone is home to more geysers than any place on Earth, and researchers are still learning about how they work.

Guests

Dr. Bob Smith, coordinating scientist at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and an emeritus professor of geophysics at the University of Utah.

Rebecca Roland, park ranger at Yellowstone National Park.