1959 – Kanab, UT – M 5.7

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

July 21, 1959 – Kanab, UT – M 5.7

This earthquake was felt over an area of 21,000 square kilometers, primarily in southern Utah and northern Arizona, according to newspaper accounts. Dishes and canned goods were knocked to the floor, cars were jostled on roads, and minor rockslides occurred. Felt reports were received from as far south as Flagstaff, Arizona–approximately 195 miles from the epicenter.

Near the epicenter, in the Kanab-Fredonia area, there were also reports of windows and dishes breaking, as well as canned goods tumbling from market shelves. In Kanab, the police chief reported bricks falling from at least one chimney. And plaster in the county courthouse was shaken from the walls. A truck driver traveling through the area at the time of the earthquake related that he “thought his steering had gone haywire.”

The earthquake, which occurred at 10:39 am local time, sent frightened Kanab residents scurrying from their homes–but no injuries or significant damage was reported.

 

For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

 

UUSS and University of Utah Seismology at AGU 2016

AGU Fall Meeting 2016 (American Geophysical Union) presentations from UUSS and other University of Utah Seismologists.

Amir Allam

Jamie Farrell

Paul Geimer

Keith Koper

Guanning Pang

Kevin Ward

Sin-Mei Wu

Hao Zhang

 

Origins of a National Seismic System in the United States

Origins of a National Seismic System in the United States

John R. Filson, Walter J. Arabasz

ABSTRACT

This historical review traces the origins of the current national seismic system in the United States, a cooperative effort that unifies national, regional, and local-scale seismic monitoring within the structure of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). The review covers (1) the history and technological evolution of U.S. seismic networks leading up to the 1990s, (2) factors that made the 1960s and 1970s a watershed period for national attention to seismology, earthquake hazards, and seismic monitoring, (3) genesis of the vision of a national seismic system during 1980–1983, (4) obstacles and breakthroughs during 1984–1989, (5) consensus building and convergence during 1990–1992, and finally (6) the twostep realization of a national system during 1993–2000. Particular importance is placed on developments during the period between 1980 and 1993 that culminated in the adoption of a charter for the Council of the National Seismic System (CNSS)—the foundation for the later ANSS. Central to this story is how many individuals worked together toward a common goal of a more rational and sustainable approach to national earthquake monitoring in the United States. The review ends with the emergence of ANSS during 1999 and 2000 and its statutory authorization by Congress in November 2000.

1915 – Provo, UT – M 5.0

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

July 15, 1915 – Provo, UT – M 5.0

map-july15_1915

According to newspaper accounts this earthquake was felt throughout the Utah, Salt Lake, and Bear River Valleys, and also in Provo Canyon, Tooele, Parley’s Canyon, and Park City, Utah.  The felt area measured 13,000 square kilometers.

In parts of Utah Valley buildings swayed, chimneys toppled, building walls were cracked, and individuals were knocked from chairs and couches. Wallpaper was split over doors and plaster was cracked and shaken loose. Dishes and pans rattled. In Provo Canyon shaking from the earthquake caused rockslides which blocked at least one road. At Utah Lake an upheaval of water, like a small tidal wave, was sighted.

In the Salt Lake Valley clocks stopped, windows and dishes rattled, and furniture was knocked over. Cans and packages were shaken from grocery store shelves.

Shaking appeared to be more pronounced in the upper floors of taller buildings both in Provo and Salt Lake City. In some locations both in the Utah and Salt Lake Valleys, the shaking caused individuals to rush out of buildings. This was the case throughout Provo where people hurried into the streets wondering what had happened. It was reported that more than an hour passed before the city resumed normal activities.

There were no reports of injuries or significant damage from the earthquake.

 

For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

 

Magnitude 3.2 near Bluffdale, Utah

PRESS RELEASE

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: November 25, 2016 09:45 AM MST
The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.2 occurred at 08:45 AM on November 25, 2016
(MST). The epicenter of the shock was located 6 miles below the
Traverse Mountains at the southern end of the Salt Lake Valley, 4.1 mi
SW of Bluffdale, UT. This earthquake was widely felt in the southern
Salt Lake Valley and northern Utah Valley. The largest earthquake
previously recorded in this area was a magnitude 4.1 event on March 16,
1992.

Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.
Earthquake Summary:
Date (UTC): November 25, 2016 Time (UTC): 15:45

Date (local): November 25, 2016 Time (local): 08:45 AM MST

Latitude: 40 27.17′ N

Longitude: 111 59.83′ W

Preferred magnitude: 3.20 Ml

Salt Lake City’s Fix the Bricks Program

Fix the Bricks is Salt lake City’s plan to help homeowners afford seismic improvments to homes.

Unreinforced masonry buildings and homes (URMs) create the greatest risk for the Salt Lake Valley in the expected Utah earthquake. Fix the Bricks, facilitates seismic improvements to URMs to save lives. Preparedness starts at home, Act Now! Determine if your home is at risk and register to receive more information about how to get started including financial incentives available for making seismic improvement.

RIGHT NOW YOU CAN APPLY FOR A GRANT TO RECEIVE UP TO 75% OF YOUR SEISMIC RETROFIT COST.

Sign up at www.bereadyslc.com/go/doc/6354/2122438/

KSL.com story

1975 – Yellowstone National Park, WY – M 6.1

Intermountain Seismic Belt Historical Earthquake Project

June 30, 1975 – Yellowstone National Park, WY – M 6.1

map-june30_1975
This earthquake was located approximately 5 miles ESE of Norris Junction, in Yellowstone National Park. According to newspaper accounts, no casualties resulted from the earthquake and damage was minor. Near the epicenter, telephone service was temporarily knocked out. The earthquake also dislodged boulders that temporarily blocked a road between Norris and Madison Junction – however, campgrounds and park facilities remained open.

A park service employee reported, “There wasn’t any noise; no dishes rattled. There was just a gentle rolling of the floor.”

The earthquake shook buildings and rattled windows 200 miles away from the epicenter, and was reported felt both in Great Falls and Billings, Montana. The total felt area of the earthquake was 50,000 square kilometers.

A significant aftershock (magnitude 5.5) occurred just over 17 months later on December 8, 1976, approximately 5 miles W of Norris Junction. This earthquake was the largest since the June 30, 1975 main shock, and was felt over an area of 5,000 square kilometers.

Park officials noted that the aftershock shook buildings, but no damage was reported. One park official believed that damage to the terrain would likely be limited to rockslides. The earthquake occurred after the close of the summer tourist season – the park service received no inquiries about the earthquake from individuals inside park boundaries.

 

For additional information about this earthquake:

Earthquake Summary 3D Newspaper Articles 3D Additional Resources 3D Blank Thumbnail

For more information about this project:

ISB Hist EQ Proj

 

UUSS Welcomes Postdoctoral Research Associate, Dr. Hao Zhang

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Dr. Hao Zhang recently joined the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Earthquake Seismology. He comes to Utah from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Northwestern University where he was a postdoctoral researcher.

Dr. Zhang received both his B.S. and Ph.D. in Geophysics from Peking University. His doctoral dissertation was titled, “Imaging the Rupture Processes of Earthquakes Using the Relative Backprojection Method”.

Some of his research accomplishments include:

  • Rapidly resolving rupture processes of the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake and its Mw 7.3 aftershock using a multi-array back-projection method.
  • Relocating a scattering source in the Lake Superior region.
  • Detecting microseismic events and performing cluster analyses in the south Chicago suburban region.
  • Studying the crustal structure in the Middle Continent Rift System using P-wave receiver functions.
  • Investigating the topography of the 410 km discontinuity in the Java subduction zone using 3-D pre-stacked Kirchhoff migration.

Dr. Zhang will work with UUSS faculty, staff, and students on problems of earthquake detection, location, and characterization in the Intermountain West.

Kristine Pankow (Associate Director, UUSS) says, “We are excited to have Hao join our research team here at UUSS. He brings valuable skills that will help us move our research forward.”

Dr. Bob Smith’s interview on NPR’s Hear & Now

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson takes a tour of Yellowstone National Park’s geyser basin with a park ranger and a scientist who’s been studying the geology of the park for nearly 60 years.

Yellowstone is home to more geysers than any place on Earth, and researchers are still learning about how they work.

Guests

Dr. Bob Smith, coordinating scientist at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and an emeritus professor of geophysics at the University of Utah.

Rebecca Roland, park ranger at Yellowstone National Park.

 

Mag 3.5 near Granger, Wyoming

PRESS RELEASE
University of Utah Seismograph Stations
Released: July 02, 2016 05:54 PM MDT
The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor
earthquake of magnitude 3.5 occurred at 04:14 PM on July 02, 2016
(MDT).  The epicenter of the shock was located in southwest Wyoming,
5 miles NNE of the town of Granger, WY and 26.3 miles W of Green River,
WY.  Twenty-two earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred
within 25 km of the epicenter of this event since 1962.
Anyone who felt the earthquake is encouraged to fill out a survey form
either on the Seismograph Stations website: www.quake.utah.edu or the
US Geological Survey website: earthquake.usgs.gov.
Date (UTC):   July 02, 2016         Time (UTC):   22:14
Date (local): July 02, 2016         Time (local): 04:14 PM MDT
Latitude:     41 39.83′ N
Longitude:    109 56.40′ W
Preferred magnitude: 3.5 Ml